Low-Fat Diet Trims Three and a Half Pounds in Six Months

December 7, 2012 7:53 am 0 comments

OK, it’s not shocking news, maybe not even news, but it is an authoritative reminder: if you cut fat intake, you cut fat–roughly three and half pounds of it. That’s the conclusion of researchers at East Anglia University who reviewed 33 studies involving more than 73,000 people in Europe, North America and, for what it’s worth, New Zealand. A University of East Anglia news release reports that the researchers found that eating less fat reduces body weight by 1.6kg, (3.5 pounds), BMI by 0.56kg/m² and waist circumference by 0.5cm. All of those losses were seen in trials in which people were not trying to lose weight, and the weight loss was maintained over at least seven years. Read more from East Anglia University. Read the study in the British Medical Journal.

Leave a Reply


Recent Posts

  • Fitness Pain For Torn Meniscus, Try Exercise Before Surgery

    For Torn Meniscus, Try Exercise Before Surgery

    Many doctors, mainly orthopedic surgeons, would like us to think that surgical repair is the best fix for a torn meniscus, and for some particularly large tears, that may be true. But now comes a study from orthopedic surgeons at Martina Hansens Hospital in Sandvika, Norway, which tracked outcomes for 140 meniscal tear patients, half of whom had surgery and half of whom did knee exercises three times a week for three months. HealthDay reports that after two years, pain, […]

    Read more →
  • Pain Women's Health 40 Percent Of Sunscreens Don’t Cut It

    40 Percent Of Sunscreens Don’t Cut It

    The seasonal advice “Don’t forget the sunscreen” should be amended this year to “Don’t forget the sunscreen that actually works,” a category that includes only 60 percent of the top-selling sunscreens. How do we know? Because when researchers at Northwestern University looked at the top rated 1 percent of the 6,500 sunscreens with four or more stars sold on Amazon.com, they found that about 40 percent of them don’t meet the American Academy of Dermatology’s guidelines for sunscreens, mainly because of a […]

    Read more →
  • Fitness Pain Exercise Does More For Some Than For Others

    Exercise Does More For Some Than For Others

    Life isn’t fair, and neither, apparently, is exercise: it appears to help some people more than others. Researchers at Brown University analyzed the results of 160 clinical trials of the cardiometabolic benefits of exercise showing which health indicators improve most with physical activity and for whom. Who were the winners? Men, people under 50, and people battling type 2 diabetes or other cardiovascular conditions. A Brown University news release reports that the researchers also found that while exercise appears to affect […]

    Read more →
  • Pain Women's Health Exercise Improves Memory of Breast Cancer Survivors

    Exercise Improves Memory of Breast Cancer Survivors

    Many breast cancer survivors have trouble remembering things, a problem that researchers attribute to stress, rather than to chemotherapy or radiation. Now comes research from Northwestern University linking physical activity to higher levels of self-confidence, lower distress and less fatigue, which in turn is associated with lower levels of perceived memory impairment. A Northwestern news release reports that when investigators looked at memory and exercise in breast cancer survivors in two studies: one in self-reported data for 1,477 women across […]

    Read more →
  • Pain Sex Another Attempt To Predict Lethal Prostate Cancer

    Another Attempt To Predict Lethal Prostate Cancer

    Someday medical experts will figure out what everyone wants to figure out about prostate cancer: how to distinguish aggressive, life-threatening cancer from indolent, unusual cell growth that will harmlessly hang around until something else kills you first. On recent attempt at the Brigham & Women’s Hospital has persuaded researchers that measuring PSA levels in younger men (between the ages of 40 and 59) could predict future risk of lethal prostate cancer later in life. Science Daily reports on the research, […]

    Read more →
  • Eating Well Pain Chronic Fatigue: It’s In Your Gut

    Chronic Fatigue: It’s In Your Gut

    After years of doubt about whether the condition known as chronic fatigue syndrome is really a syndrome, researchers have identified biological markers of the disease in gut bacteria and inflammatory microbial agents in the blood of chronic fatigue sufferers. A Cornell University news release reports that researchers at the school correctly diagnosed chronic fatigue syndrome in 83 percent of patients through stool samples and blood work. When researchers sequenced regions of microbial DNA from the stool samples they found that […]

    Read more →
  • Attitude Pain Stressed? Make Some Art

    Stressed? Make Some Art

    Feeling stressed? Paint a picture, even a bad picture. Researchers at Drexel University are convinced that making art, pretty much any art, reduces the stress hormones in our bodies. Most of the time.  A Drexel news release reports that the researchers studied 39 adults, ranging from 18 to 59 years old, who participated in 45 minutes of art-making. Cortisol levels were taken before and after the art-making period. The participants, half of whom had no real experience making art, were given markers […]

    Read more →
  • Attitude Pain How You Argue And What It Means For Your Health

    How You Argue And What It Means For Your Health

    How you argue says a lot about how your health will fare, according to research recently conducted at UC Berkeley. A Berkeley news release warns that people who rage with frustration during a marital spat are likely to develop high blood pressure, and those who keep a stiff upper lip may experience musculoskeletal ailments such as a bad back or stiff muscles. The study, based on 20 years of research, found that the link between emotions and health outcomes was most […]

    Read more →