We Are Fat Because We Are Hungry, And Here’s Why

May 17, 2014 8:06 am 2 comments

In a long and well-read (over 200 comments) piece in the New York Times76444-354x233-Bagel, two obesity researchers explain why we are fat– because we eat too much; why we eat too much–because we are always hungry; and why we are always hungry–because we eat the wrong foods. By wrong foods, they mean processed foods and high carbohydrate foods. David S. Ludwig, director of the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center at Boston Children’s Hospital and a professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Mark I. Friedman, vice president of research at the Nutrition Science Initiative don’t say anything that hasn’t been said before, but they say it persuasively, because they back it up evidence, including two studies conducted by Ludwig. In one, the Times reports, Ludwig examined 21 overweight and obese young adults after they had lost 10 to 15 percent of their body weight, on diets ranging from low fat to low carbohydrate. Despite consuming the same number of calories on each diet, subjects burned about 325 more calories per day on the low carbohydrate than on the low fat diet — amounting to the energy expended in an hour of moderately intense physical activity. In another, Ludwig found that rats fed a diet with rapidly digesting (called high “glycemic index”) carbohydrate gained 71 percent more fat than their counterparts, who ate more calories over all, though in the form of slowly digesting carbohydrate. Here’s the bottom line:  “With reduced consumption of refined grains, concentrated sugar and potato products and a few other sensible lifestyle choices, our internal body weight control system should be able to do the rest. Eventually, we could bring the body weight set point back to pre-epidemic levels. Addressing the underlying biological drive to overeat may make for a far more practical and effective solution to obesity than counting calories.” Read more in the New York Times.

2 Comments

  • Add to that dysfunctional fat cells as evidenced by the “gut” which is indicative of shortening telomeres and is also evidence of dysfunctional cells in other body tissues. This is what we arrive at. Total calories is at issue especially for those who have this issue earlier in life then becomes exacerbated with the lack of effective cells otherwise we would not become ravenously hungry until the energy stores were closer to depletion. The addictive food additives(flavor enhancers magnify the problem dramatically.

  • Sugar and high fructose corn syrup among others more addictive than cocaine. Virtually all of us alive now are so because of the desire for high energy foods even today when foods are quite plentiful, someone without this trait would probably die of starvation specifically for lack of calories-energy as most other foods require more net energy to process than they provide. Those without the sweet tooth, including high calorie fats/carbohydrates probably succumbed during food shortages-famines.

Leave a Reply


Recent Posts

  • Pain Sex Another Troublesome Thing About Testosterone

    Another Troublesome Thing About Testosterone

    First, we learned that low testosterone can make us nicer people, or at least nicer male people. Now it looks like it can also spare us the frustration of prostate enlargement. Maybe. Researchers at the University of California at Santa Barbara are convinced that an overabundance of testosterone may be the dark force behind enlarged prostates. A UC Santa Barbara news release points out that benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) — or, simply, prostate enlargement — is one of the most common […]

    Read more →
  • Fitness Pain Exercise and Irregular Heartbeats: Yes and No

    Exercise and Irregular Heartbeats: Yes and No

    Is it safe to exercise if you experience atrial fibrillation, commonly known as irregular heartbeat? The short answer, according to researchers at the Texas Cardiac Arrhythmia Institute, is probably, but it depends on the type of atrial fibrillation and the intensity of the exercise. HealthDay reports that after reviewing 14 studies involving 380,000 people with atrial fibrillation, the researchers are persuaded that moderate and vigorous levels of exercise are safe for women with atrial fibrillation but vigorous exercise may be risky […]

    Read more →
  • Fitness Pain Advice for Runners With Allergies

    Advice for Runners With Allergies

    Itchy eyes and sniffles no doubt seem insignificant to someone who’s pushing her body to run 26 miles, but researchers at Northumbria University are convinced that it’s a mistake for marathoners to ignore such symptoms. Why? Because, they warn, allergies that manifest themselves in itchy eyes and runny noses can lead to exercise induced asthma and inflammations of the airways. ScienceDaily reports on research involving 150 runners in the London marathon, 61 percent of whom reported nose and eye allergy […]

    Read more →
  • Fitness Pain Hand Grip Strength Predicts Heart Risk

    Hand Grip Strength Predicts Heart Risk

    Do you really want to know if you’re a candidate for a heart attack? Researchers at McMaster University suggest periodically testing your hand-grip strength, keeping an eye out for any significant dip. HealthDay reports that the researchers tested the hand-grip strength of 140,000 people between the ages of 35 and 70, then followed up with more tests and a general health assessment for an average of four years. The envelope please….The researchers found that every 11-pound decrease in grip strength […]

    Read more →
  • Pain To Reduce Pain, Say “Ow”

    To Reduce Pain, Say “Ow”

    “Ow, that hurts” apparently hurts less than just “that hurts,–” 20 percent less, to be precise. That’s the verdict from researchers at the National University of Singapore, where scientists asked 55 students to immerse one hand into ice-cold water. The students were then tested in five scenarios which included saying “ow”; sitting passively; pressing a button; listening to a recording of them saying “ow”; and listening to another person saying “ow”. The envelope please….The researchers found that participants who sat passively could […]

    Read more →
  • Pain Researcher Says Fix Meniscal Tears, Even The Small Ones

    Researcher Says Fix Meniscal Tears, Even The Small Ones

    Perhaps you’ve been putting off consultation about what feels like minor tear in your meniscus. That, say researchers at University of Missouri, is a bad idea–because even the small tears can cause big problems if left unrepaired.  A U of Missouri news release reports that researchers at the school’s Mizzou Motion Analysis Center used sensors and infrared cameras to measure the pressure on knees during routine movements like getting up out of a chair (which, it turns out, can put […]

    Read more →
  • Fitness Pain Polygamy Is Bad For Your Heart

    Polygamy Is Bad For Your Heart

    Remember the old joke about the penalty for bigamy being two wives? It’s not that funny anymore, thanks to research conducted at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, suggesting that the more wives you have, the worse your heart health is likely to be. Science Daily reports on the study, which involved 687 married men (average age 59) Around two-thirds of the men had one wife (68%) while 19% had 2 wives, 10% had 3 […]

    Read more →
  • Pain What To Do About The Worst Allergy Season In Years

    What To Do About The Worst Allergy Season In Years

    First, the bad news. Allergy experts remind us that cold winters generally make for bad allergy seasons, and this winter, at least in the northeast, was brutally cold.  And now the good news: Yale immunology researcher Dr. Tao Zheng suggests a few things we can do get through what may be worst allergy season in years. Keep windows closed during pollen season, especially during the day Stay indoors during midday and afternoon hours when pollen counts are highest Take a […]

    Read more →