Wait, Now Low-Salt Diets Are Bad For Us

August 14, 2014 8:59 am 2 comments

Remember the adviimagesce from health experts to minimize the amount of salt in our diets? Now hear this: a new study that tracked more than 100,000 people for more than three years found that people who consumed fewer than 3,000 milligrams of sodium a day had a 27 percent higher risk of death or a serious cardiac even than those whose intake was estimated at 3,000 to 6,000 milligrams. OK, how much salt is 3,000 milligrams? Less than most Americans eat. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the average American consumes 3,400 milligrams of salt a day. It’s also much more than the 1,500 milligrams a day that is recommended by the American Heart Association, and more than the 2,000 milligrams a day recommended by the World Health Organization. The Wall Street Journal reports on the study, which is published in the New England Journal of Medicine, and which also found, pay attention to this– that risk of death or other major events increased with intake above 6,000 milligrams.

2 Comments

  • interesting

  • I say all the time that one day it will be shown that DEATH causes cancer. Just sit back and wait a while. Food in general will be found as the cause of strokes and heart attacks. After all, everyone who has had one had eaten something at some time.

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