Fitness, Pain

Testosterone May Impair Sleep

Men with many things to keep0199210896.testosterone.1 them up at night can add another suspect to the list: testosterone. Researchers at the University of Chicago Sleep, Metabolism and Health Center evaluated the sleep of 44 men, all of whom were overweight or obese, but otherwise healthy.  A news release from the Endocrine Society reports that the researchers studied the brain’s slow-wave activity during non-rapid eye movement sleep, a reliable marker of sleep depth. Too little slow-wave activity can leave a person feeling unrested in the morning. To their surprise, the researchers found that a person’s BMI had no influence on slow-wave activity, but testosterone did. The big concern? As doctors increasingly prescribe testosterone to aging men, they may increasingly be interfering with a good night’s sleep.

2 Comments

  1. Seems prescriptions (testosterone)given to geezers to help them keep it up is keeping them up.

  2. Bill Finley

    The observation of an inverse relationship between testosterone (T) and slow-wave deep sleep (SWS) is interesting to me both personally and professionally (retired sleep disorders specialist). Personally, I have monitored my own sleep at home each night for many years and have observed dismally low levels of SWS. It is well documented that SWS does decrease with advancing age, however so does T in most men. Although I am now in mu early 70s I am in very good health and run road and trail races and also Mt. Bike. My T levels, probably as a result of my exercise regimen are at the top of the charts for my age, or indeed at any age. So now I have new understanding as to why my SWS is low. The question I now have is why an inverse relationship between SWS and T? In the sleep literature SWS is viewed as restorative and one would think that I would need a lot of restorative sleep to repair stressed muscles from exercise workouts of running long distance and Mt. biking. Indeed, recovery from muscle soreness takes longer in aging runners and bikers so that fits with the decline in SWS, but then the question is why does regular, intense exercise pump up TST? I always thought that was a good thing but now, armed with this new information, I am beginning to wonder.

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