Running For Fitness: Stop At 30 Miles Per Week

August 13, 2014 8:15 am 1 comment

OK, the first thing to consider isRunning that this study was done with heart-attack survivors. The second thing to know is there are plenty of studies that contradict its findings. What ev, here we go. Researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at Hartford Hospital studied the relationship between exercise and cardiovascular disease-related deaths in about 2,400 physically active heart-attack survivors, using the National Walkers’ and Runners’ Health Studies databases. What did they find? A reduction of cardiovascular events of up to 65 percent among people who were running less than 30 miles or walking less than 46 miles per week. Beyond this point, however, the benefit of exercise was lost in what is described as a reverse J-curve pattern.“Results suggest that the benefits of running or walking do not accrue indefinitely and that above some level, perhaps 30 miles per week of running, there is a significant increase in risk,” the researchers write in an Alpha Galileo news release.”Competitive running events also appear to increase the risk of an acute event.” But wait, the same Alpha Galileo report describes a meta-analysis of the mortality of 42,000 top athletes that found that elite athletes (mostly men) live longer than the general population. Yes, more research is needed.

1 Comment

  • Everyone has their running limits be it due to their age, recoverability, body type, etc.
    Thirty miles/week is a pretty fair amount of roadwork and not too many people, I suspect, run this many miles. That’s six five mile days in a week or some such mix. Pretty challenging at that.

    I think most of us geezers won’t run that much and like to mix our workouts up with time in the weightroom, basketball court, swimming pool, surfing, etc. Thirty miles a week would really detract from that.

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