Question About Exercise? Don’t Ask Your Doctor

August 1, 2014 7:40 am 4 comments

Got a question about exerciseimages-1 or nutrition? Don’t ask your doctor; chances are three to one that she won’t have an answer, and if she did, she doesn’t think it’s her job to talk about such things. The Washington Post reports that a recent poll of doctors revealed that fewer than one-eighth of visits to physicians include any nutrition counseling, and fewer than 25 percent of physicians believe they have sufficient training to talk to patients about diet or physical activity. And the number of hours devoted to teaching future physicans about nutrition in medical school has actually declined recently, from 22.3  in 2004 to 19.6 in 2009.

4 Comments

  • Then I guess it’s a sure bet my doctor won’t know anything if I ask for some steroids.
    Although that picture looks like someone who is afflicted with roide rage.

  • Doctors should at least ask the patient to describe his general diet, and if it’s deficient,recommend changes.

  • Agreed. Considering the fitness level of my doctor, he’d be the last person I’d ask for advice about nutrition and fitness.

  • This is news? This issue has been going on for decades. I’m fairly experienced in nutrition and health , and those involved in nutrition have been talking and writing about this since the 50’s. Doctors and most primary health care professionals can’t be totally blamed as the education system for them just doesn’t focus on the relationship between health and nutrition..
    Your best option is to read about nutrition and health for yourself and become an educated consumer. One word of caution is to get your information from respected sources in the fields. There is a lot of nutritional science fiction out there vs nutritional/medical science facts. One thing that I always try to check, is there any peer reviewed scientific studies and reports to back up what you are reading or being told. This is especially important as a consumer if you are considering purchasing any nutritional products.

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