Another Key To Healthy Aging: Self Esteem

March 18, 2014 7:56 am 1 comment

Feeling good and feeling good about yourself have a lot in common, according to researchers at Concordia University. HealthDayimages reports that the scientists at the school surveyed 147 people aged 60 and older, following them for four years, and checking their health, their levels of the stress hormone cortisol, and symptoms of depression and degree of self-esteem. The envelope please…the researchers found that when people’s self-esteem decreased, they had an increase in cortisol levels, and vice versa, and that the link between self-esteem and cortisol levels was especially strong in people with a history of stress or depression. So yes, the researchers came away convinced that maintaining or improving self-esteem could help prevent health problems typically associated with aging.

1 Comment

  • So when I feel good, I feel good.
    Good thing we have studies to prove such things.
    Get a life, lab rats!

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