Pain, Sex

Another Confusing Study About Prostate Cancer Treatment

images-1Should men have a PSA test? And if the test turns of up some cancerous cells, should they treat it? One year after many cancer experts advised against both actions, a Swedish study involving 695 men diagnosed with prostate cancer in the 1980s and 1990s has shown that those who had a localized tumor removed in a radical prostatectomy were 44 percent less likely to die of the disease. The Los Angeles Times reports on the study, which appears in Thursday’s edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, and also finds that the more time that passed since their diagnosis, the greater the benefits of early surgery became. The paper reports that men who chose watchful-waiting were significantly more likely to have their prostate cancer spread elsewhere in the body, and while that spread wasn’t t necessarily life-threatening it did lead to treatment with hormone therapy, which increases the likelihood of impotence, reduced libido, loss of muscle mass and depression. Read more in the Los Angeles Times.


  1. Maybe this study will inject some logic into the PSA debate. I am one who benefited from early detection and surgery(seed implant) over 15 years ago. In my mind, dismissing early detection and treatment is unconscionable.

  2. I have just finished seed inplants, my first Lupon shot and will start radiation therapy later this month. If I had not had PSA test I would have been detected with gleason 9 and high risk cancer. Psa test and early dection possibly saved my life or at the every least extended it. I was diagnosed at the of 79.

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